Dissecting Romney’s Obamacare Interview on Leno

I wanted to take a moment and dissect and digest some of the statements made by Mitt Romney on his interview with Jay Leno and give you my take on them. For those of you who have not seen presidential candidate Mitt Romney’s quick interview on Jay Leno, you can check it out at the end of this post). My comments do not, in any way, endorse any candidate or their views on fixing our health care system. You can draw your own conclusions when the polls open! Continue reading…

The Vicious Cycle of Winners and Losers

Ask any Public Health Practitioner what the biggest public health success story is and they will mention the eradication of smallpox. Across the globe, this accomplishment is seen as the biggest contribution public health brought onto society and a sort of proof-of-concept that illness can be dealt with even before onset. Yet if you ask the Public Health Community what the current most pressing public health concern should be, you will never get consensus. Infectious disease connoisseurs will bring forward the re-emergence of infectious diseases, chronic disease experts will point to the majority of top 10 leading causes of death (in the US) as being chronic. HIV/AIDS researchers will underline the fact that HIV/AIDS can lead to other infectious/chronic diseases, yet diabetes researchers could state the same. Continue reading…

The Health Currency – Part I – Happiness

Health (as a currency) is the internal, intrinsic concept that, believe it or not, we all choose to ignore. If you do a quick Google search to find what makes people happy, you’ll find many articles that mention social relationships, gratitude, forgiveness, family and friends, having a meaningful and rewarding job. Yet not many writings mention health as a contributor to our overall happiness. In fact, health (and more specific, physical health) seems to only marginally affect our overall happiness. To put it a different way, the LACK of health makes us sad, yet the presence of good health is most often taken for granted.

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The Millennial Patient

I’m an “eighties baby” and, as such, I’m a millennial. I’m the internet child….born with a cell phone in one hand, an iPad in another, and a laptop in my lap. I no longer subscribe to letters because email is instant, and I don’t carry cash because its “safer” to use a debit card. In the age of hyperspeed, however, I still carry around an insurance card that grants me access to see a doctor, manually request my appointment notes, individually call to get lab results and patiently wait while a nurse fills out my patient history section of the chart.

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